The Wild Pear Tree

I’ve always had a bit of a soft spot for epics.  There is just something about a movie that is really long (this one clocks in at over 3 hours) that unfolds slowly and lets the viewer roll around in the story without worrying about getting somewhere in a hurry.  This film has a bit of an epic feel to it because of length and pacing but I disagree with some of the reviews that referred to it as such.  In a way it reminded me of Once Upon a Time in America.

The story is about a young man named Sinan who is returning home after graduating from college.  Sinan seems to be struggling with what so many people that age seem to struggle with – they seem to know everything and despise where they grew up and the people that live there.  Sinan’s primary target is his gambling-addicted father.  Never mind that the father put him through school and gave him a good home – the father has made him pay a price.  Sinan later verbally insults a local author, businessman and cleric with the same caustic and know-it-all attitude (although if I am being honest he seemed calm and rational when discussing religion, which was a bit odd).

Anyway, Sinan is the prototypical entitled youth.  He recently completely an unpublished work so he feels qualified to critique literature.  He graduated college so he feels elevated enough to insult the uneducated business man.  He has never had a girlfriend but he lectures his mother on women.  In a sense it reminded me of one of my favorite quotes – he was born on second base and thought that he had hit a double.  Not surprisingly the relationship between father and son (and even grandfather) is prominent and I would say that the final scene is satisfying (even if a little bit odd for a minute).

IHATEBadMovies.com reviews The Wild Pear Tree
Poster for the movie "The Wild Pear Tree"

Movie title: The Wild Pear Tree

Movie description: Sinan is passionate about literature and has always wanted to be a writer. Returning to the village where he was born, he pours his heart and soul into scraping together the money he needs to be published, but his father’s debts catch up with him.

Date published: 2020-02-28

Director(s): Nuri Bilge Ceylan

Actor(s): Aydın Doğu Demirkol, Murat Cemcir, Bennu Yıldırımlar, Hazar Ergüçlü, Serkan Keskin, Tamer Levent, Akın Aksu, Ahmet Rıfat Şungar, Kubilay Tunçer, Öner Erkan, Özay Fecht, Kadir Çermik, Ercüment Balakoğlu, Sencar Sağdıç, Asena Keskinci

Genre: Drama

My Review

I’ve always had a bit of a soft spot for epics.  There is just something about a movie that is really long (this one clocks in at over 3 hours) that unfolds slowly and lets the viewer roll around in the story without worrying about getting somewhere in a hurry.  This film has a bit of an epic feel to it because of length and pacing but I disagree with some of the reviews that referred to it as such.  In a way it reminded me of Once Upon a Time in America.

The story is about a young man named Sinan who is returning home after graduating from college.  Sinan seems to be struggling with what so many people that age seem to struggle with – they seem to know everything and despise where they grew up and the people that live there.  Sinan’s primary target is his gambling-addicted father.  Never mind that the father put him through school and gave him a good home – the father has made him pay a price.  Sinan later verbally insults a local author, businessman and cleric with the same caustic and know-it-all attitude (although if I am being honest he seemed calm and rational when discussing religion, which was a bit odd).

Anyway, Sinan is the prototypical entitled youth.  He recently completely an unpublished work so he feels qualified to critique literature.  He graduated college so he feels elevated enough to insult the uneducated business man.  He has never had a girlfriend but he lectures his mother on women.  In a sense it reminded me of one of my favorite quotes – he was born on second base and thought that he had hit a double.  Not surprisingly the relationship between father and son (and even grandfather) is prominent and I would say that the final scene is satisfying (even if a little bit odd for a minute).

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